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Maple Magic

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Following the Beekeeping AV recently posted on Beechbrook...

Another re-working of a 35mm dual projector show from 13-14 years ago.

Started out as a 14 minute AV and when digitized 9 years ago (at 800x600) three versions were produced: 14 min, 10 min and this 5 minute version.

This is a 1440x1080 version with some updated images for changing technology.

click here to download.

Also available on You Tube here

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Guest Yachtsman1

Watched the Youtube version, very informative piece about a subject I knew nothing about. Tried it on my pancakes on my trips across the pond, but daren't even look at it now,as my arteries start to throb. Still holds up after all this time. Brought to mind a very comical show I saw some time ago, I think at the NE AV group meeting called I think "Cholesterol", that also had a similar effect on my arteries. Brightened my afternoon.

Regards Eric

Yachtsman1. :D/>

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Watched the Youtube version, very informative piece about a subject I knew nothing about. Tried it on my pancakes on my trips across the pond, but daren't even look at it now,as my arteries start to throb. Still holds up after all this time. Brought to mind a very comical show I saw some time ago, I think at the NE AV group meeting called I think "Cholesterol", that also had a similar effect on my arteries. Brightened my afternoon.

Regards Eric

Yachtsman1. :D/>/>

Eric: It is liquid sugar, but some research has a lot of good things to say about it

read here

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ERIC

some background on maple syrup

https://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4ADFA_enCA470CA470&q=MAPLE+SYRUP+THEFT

after the big ww2 war my Dad would buy a gallon of syrup which would be made buy farmers that owned sugar bushes - their set up was nothing like the one that Jim has shown us - that is a real beauty

the ones that i have seen were a shack in the bush with access by horse and sleigh -- sap was collected manually from pails and dumped in a tank on the sleigh - sap was evaporated in trays till the specific gravity was correct then packaged and sold

it was a treat we looked forward to every spring -- thanks for the memory Jim

T'WAS GREAT )

KEN

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ERIC

some background on maple syrup

https://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4ADFA_enCA470CA470&q=MAPLE+SYRUP+THEFT

after the big ww2 war my Dad would buy a gallon of syrup which would be made buy farmers that owned sugar bushes - their set up was nothing like the one that Jim has shown us - that is a real beauty

the ones that i have seen were a shack in the bush with access by horse and sleigh -- sap was collected manually from pails and dumped in a tank on the sleigh - sap was evaporated in trays till the specific gravity was correct then packaged and sold

it was a treat we looked forward to every spring -- thanks for the memory Jim

T'WAS GREAT )

KEN

Ken there are still a number of sugar bushes that still collect by bucket and sleigh.

And still a good number of wood burning evaporators around as well.

I have a friend (the person who is the beekeeper in the last AV) who has buckets on 12 of his maple trees around his house. He boils the sap down on his kitchen stove.

Glad it brought back memories

Jim

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Good one Jim!! Thanks!!!

It's great to see how the big commercial operations work. I have friends in Vermont who still do it the old ways. When I was visiting them in 2010 I cut a cord of wood for their "sugar shack" to help with the process. They usually produce about 25 gallons of great tasting maple syrup each year and tap their trees by hand and collect in buckets. It's all boiled down in their wood fired evaporator and their 10 acres of maple trees have been producing for about 30 years now...

Best regards,

Lin

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Good one Jim!! Thanks!!!

It's great to see how the big commercial operations work. I have friends in Vermont who still do it the old ways. When I was visiting them in 2010 I cut a cord of wood for their "sugar shack" to help with the process. They usually produce about 25 gallons of great tasting maple syrup each year and tap their trees by hand and collect in buckets. It's all boiled down in their wood fired evaporator and their 10 acres of maple trees have been producing for about 30 years now...

Best regards,

Lin

You're welcome Lin.

Up here syrup producers use a production of one litre of finished syrup per tap as an estimate for a "normal" year.

The featured sugar bush has been in production for over 40 years. In 1998 a very bad 3 day freezing rain storm hit this bush, and many others in the area. A lot of trees had extensive damage but came back in a few years. As a result of the storm, and so much damage caused by downed limbs, all new collection lines and pipelines had to be installed.

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Jim,

Very informative presentation and good commentary. I now know what goes into making maple syrup.

Thank you for sharing.

Colin

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Jim,

Very informative presentation and good commentary. I now know what goes into making maple syrup.

Thank you for sharing.

Colin

Glad it was helpful.

I should look at my shows and see if there is something I can put up from South Africa, in addition to "the Dance" and "African Flowers" that are already on Beechbrook.

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