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Barry Beckham

Nov 2018 Newsletter and Videos

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Open Pdf HERE   NB. The Perspective Panning Video is different from the one already posted on this forum. I decided to revisit the technique in full HD resolution. There is also a slide style included too, but as the video explains, it can't be right in all situations because every image is unique. It could be used as a tester for the technique though

Nov BD.jpg

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Good newsletter.  I also marvel at how many times we see high ISO with a small aperture. In your diagram, you show f4.0  at 1/2500th at 70 mm and ISO 800.  If that applies to the related image, I can understand f4 and iso 800, but not 1/2500th.  That would be most unlikely unless the photo was heavily edited later--and it obviously has been heavily edited.  Either way, there is no earthly need for 1/2500th. 

Unless there is an artistic reason to introduce noise, needlessly using high ISO simply makes no sense.  On the other hand, because I do a lot of street photography, there are many times when I snag a photo no matter what my ISO was a few minutes ago, and then--alas--sometimes I just forget and am thankful that today's sensors are tolerant of higher ISO's.

Then about shutter speed,  I might actually have used 1/2500th if I was jolting along in a 4WD Rover with a driver-late-for-supper and snagged that image out an open window.

 

Anyway, good newsletter.  

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No, those values didn’t relate to the image shown, and I thought I did mention that in the video. I used real examples of the settings, but it would be wrong to show other people’s images, even if they gave consent, especially when I’m saying the settings are illogical. However, I have to have something on screen at times

Your right, there is no earthy need for a shutter speed of 2500 in the conditions I described, which the whole point I was trying to make. The image was a real good one, but had easily avoidable visual faults and not in a positive way and it isn’t an isolated example.

If the person who used that 2500th of a second was jolting along in a 4 WD, then that may be an isolated exception, but the point of the article is these illogical settings are common, even from those who are not beginners. Now, I’m sure I don’t have to preface every sentence I write or every thing I say with: Although there may be isolated cases when these settings are right..........etc.  I am trying to make a point and when we do that, there will always be isolated cases that buck the point,  but in normal average conditions they are not right. 

I am saying to amateurs, particularly club photographers that here is something worth more attention, because it’s the cause of most, not all, but most of your visual and quality issues.

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Barry Beckham said:

 Now, I’m sure I don’t have to preface every sentence I write or every thing I say with: Although there may be isolated cases when these settings are right..........etc.  I am trying to make a point and when we do that, there will always be isolated cases that buck the point,  but in normal average conditions they are not right. 

2

No, no need to worry about addressing isolated exceptions. I really wanted to underscore a really good point you make that often baffles me as well.  I hope to encourage people to read your newsletter.

I have so often seen camera settings for beautiful pro photos that baffled me and I used to wonder if I was missing something.  Now I know that those strange settings indicate a confession that the photographer got a good photo in spite of mistakes and that photography sometimes can be a forgiving art.  

Still, a part of me is tempted to wonder if those strange settings are somehow part of some secret-sauce for which I wish I had a recipe.  Psst!  It isn't.  

 

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Thank you for your support. It's a shame when you see a really great image spoilt for lack of a little knowledge. Everyone has to start somewhere for sure. We don't all start off expert, but month in month out the same errors crop up and the judges raise much the same comments. Yet, a brief look into the meta data often tells all you need to know.

There are a few who would consider themselves expert who, as you say get a result despite the illogical settings, then so have I at times, if I'm honest

I think many are suckered into looking for that secret sauce thinking the purchase of some wiz bang presets is all they need, or some secret exposure value. :)

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Excellent, thank you.

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